Building Regs for pumps, macerators and lifting stations

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Upgrading, extending or changing the use of a building will usually involve the addition of bathroom, washing or cleaning facilities. And when conventional drainage isn’t possible there is usually a practical pumping solution from Saniflo to help with the job. Of course, prior to specifying the product required, always check the latest Building Regulations, in particular Part G and Part H.

PART G

Part G covers sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency with two key regulations affecting macerator and pump use:

Part 4.24

A WC fitted with a macerator and pump may be connected to a small-bore drainage system discharging to a discharge stack if:

  • There is also access to a WC discharging directly to a gravity system
  • The pump meets the requirements of BS EN 12050-1:2001

Part 5.10

A sanitary appliance used for personal washing fitted with a macerator and pump may be connect to a small-bore drainage system discharged to a discharge stack if:

  • There is also access to washing facilities discharging directly to a gravity system
  • The macerator and pump meet the requirements of BS EN 12050-2:2001

Part H

Covering drainage and waste disposal, the important stipulations for pumps include:

2.36      Where gravity drainage is impractical, a pumping solution will be needed

2.37      This should conform to BS EN 12050 in basements and BS EN 12056-4 for pumps located inside buildings

2.38      Lifting station/pump installations for outside buildings should refer to BS EN 752 – 6 for guidance on design

2.39      where foul water is to be pumped, the effluent receiving chamber should be sized to contain a 24hr inflow to allow for disruption in service. The minimum daily discharge of foul drainage should be taken as 150 litres per head per day for domestic use. For other types of building the capacity of the receiving chamber should be based on the calculated daily demand of the water intake for the building. Where only a proportion of the foul sewage is to be pumped, then the capacity should be pro-rata. In all pumped systems the controls should be arranged to optimise operation.

Need further clarification? Book a CPD with Saniflo here

 

 

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